we love the ocean
No water, no life. No blue, no green. - Sylvia Earle
Keep the ocean clean
We know that when we protect our oceans we're protecting our future. - William J. Clinton

About Us

Ocean covers 71% of earth surface and raise millions of lives, it also plays the role of controlling the climate. As the source of all lives, ocean is so connected with human being. Ocean conservation is important not only because of the development of tourism, also the benefit for the offspring. Therefore, Ocean Seeds Conservation Association wish to raise people’s awareness about ocean pollution, and to enhance people’s knowledge about ocean, so they can use ocean wisely and then to protect it. We shall plant a seed of ocean sustainability in everyone’s heart.

97400

Devil Rays

were caught per year

100,000

Green Sea Turtles

were killed per year

(in Indo-Australian archipelago)

100,000K

Sharks

were killed per year

25,000

Blue Whales

remain

1

events

We are part of the ocean, be the volunteer for our home

ocean news

NEW REPORT DIVES DEEP INTO THE MYEIK ARCHIPELAGO

The Myeik Archipelago along Myanmar’s southern coastline harbours hidden secrets including coral reefs teeming with life, abundant mangroves and seagrass beds, and unspoiled beaches.

Whale sharks gather at a few specific locations around the world – now we know why

The whale shark is the largest fish in the world, but much of its lifecycle remains shrouded in mystery. These gentle giants gather in just a handful of places around the globe – something which has long baffled scientists – but our new research has started to explain why.

Scientists Track Elusive Giant Manta Rays as Poaching Threats Grow

Researchers hope tagging efforts will yield new insights into mantas’ life cycle and behavior, including their migration from what could be the first confirmed nursery for juveniles in the Gulf of Mexico.

The Race to Decode Secrets of Antarctica’s Most Important Ocean Animal

The future of krill – and all the marine wildlife that feed on them – is uncertain in the changing Southern Ocean. Krill biologist Stephen Nicol says they may be adaptable to climate change, but new technologies need to be deployed to study their enigmatic behavior.